Ventoux: Welcome Back 10/31/2012


A few years back I sat in a campsite near Bédoin as the sun set over Mont Ventoux and contemplated what was to be my first time over the legend of Provence the following day. It presents an intimidating presence with the radio tower on top serving as a marker for the pain to come. It turned out to be a great day, riding it with two Aussie’s, all of us “Ventoux Virgins”. Of all of the stages in next years Centennial Tour, the Ventoux finish is the one that holds the most potential for me. The idea of two times up Alp D’Huez on paper sounds amazing, but in the end will probably cancel itself out with tactics and strategy. The ASO have set up the Ventoux finish to be an explosive day, for both GC and the stage winner (although they may not be mutually exclusive). It is the perfect stage for a Bastille Day hero. A lumpy approach before the final 20.8km ascent ensures plenty of opportunities for a solo attack, and the French now have in their ranks plenty of riders capable pulling that off. The previous three days favor the sprinters giving any of the GC contenders a chance to sit in and save as much as possible for that final all out slog. And with a rest day to follow, why hold back. So we may well be treated to the spectacle of a lone French attacker being chased down by a group of favorites in the last 5km, with a whole nation screaming him up to the finale. Recognized as one of the hardest climbs in France, and that is when the wind doesn’t blow – if they get hot and windy conditions I expect this to be an epic stage worthy of a 100 year celebration. Then there will be the 3 hour camper van race across to Embrun to get your spot on what looks like being a great TT in the Écrins and the Alps to follow. Those final 8 days might be the time to book your holidays.

Categories: Races / Riders / Routes

Big Dream By Tim Bowditch 08/24/2012


Big Dream
The world of Keirin continues to fascinate. “Big Dream” is a Keirin-specific term – basically an accumulator bet placed on the last four races of the day. If you pick two winners in those races you stand to land the “Big Dream” – the big win. We were recently contacted by UK photographer Tim Bowditch,who shared his Keirin project “Big Dream,” shot while traveling around Japan by bike last year. The images show us a side of Keirin we don’t often get to see, and present us with a different type of cycling fan. These fans are maybe more interested in a quick win than the quality of the riding, but maybe better than most understand what each rider is capable of. In a country where gambling is basically illegal, Keirin is one of four sports where government-run gambling is allowed. The quiet spaces captured here are outside the main betting and watching areas, and are where the gamblers come to study the form. The quietness in these images could not be in more contrast to the speed and energy being laid down on the track. We have taken a selection of the images here in our gallery; to see the full set of images, visit Tim’s site here.

Categories: Riders

Wiggins Immortalized By The Royal Mail 08/01/2012


Maybe one of the cooler ways to mark a great day for British cycling, Bradley Wiggins immortalized by the Royal Mail on one of their Olympic stamps. It will make a nice commemorative piece to show the grand kids – although they will probably never have seen an actual stamp or used one, so it may need some explaining.

Categories: Design / Riders

Welcome To The Pack 05/30/2012


This is my mate Paul who I grew up with back in Ireland. Paul grew up playing the hardmen sports of Gaelic football and Hurling (not for the faint of heart). I took a fair amount of ribbing growing up for riding around in lycra with shaved legs, but I knew I was on to a good thing. Well I am happy to say Paul has joined the lycra pack and taken up the bike. He got himself a nice Felt and some Elcyclista kit and just finished his first Sportive in the Mourne Mountains last weekend with a very respectable time. Next up the Wicklow 200. That should be a descent test!

Categories: Riders

10/29/2012


Nathan Young was good enough to send us this set of really nice shots from the recent Magnuson Park Cross race in Seattle. The course looks as dry as a bone which has to be an anomaly for Seattle. Look out for more shots from Nathan as the season gets a little more “sticky”

Categories: Races / Riders

Today I Love Cycling More Than Ever 08/24/2012


Today I love cycling more than ever. The day after watching Jens Voigt, one of our sport’s true and most endearing icons, take a wonderful solo win, that even his DS had doubts he could carry off. The day after “Purito” and Froome turned on the afterburners in the last 2km of yesterday’s Vuelta stage and showed Contador and Valverde their wheels. But unfortunately today these stories of heroic and breathtaking riding have been pushed down the queue by Lance. Unfortunately, today all anyone who doesn’t follow this sport will want to talk about is not if Froome can take the Vuelta, or how long can Jens continue at the top. Or even about the year-by-year growth of Wiggins to take this year’s Tour. They will only have one question for us: “Did Lance do it?” And unfortunately, with how this story has unfolded, we still seem not to have full closure.

Not really knowing what the USADA had in their files will always still leave this story unfinished for me and many others. Although, to see one of the most determined and smartest athletes I have ever followed give up is a surprise. Choosing not to fight was his best form of attack? That sure feels like an admission of sorts, but in no way feels definitive, and still feels like it will let people read it how they want. Out of all of the reactions, the one that I keep repeating in my head comes from Jan Ullrich, “I know the order in which we crossed the finish line.” In a time when most of the podium were “on it” in some form, re-awarding the seven Tour titles seems kind of pointless. I don’t think we are going to see many of Lance’s other podium companions rush in to claim his titles – most of them are as tarnished as he is, proven or not.

So maybe it is time to take a leaf out of Uli’s book and move on. There is plenty to write and talk about with those that are riding today. I am so over reading and hearing about this story, and I don’t think it is over yet. So until those USADA files see the light of day, let’s write about something else, and remember why we love this sport. You know Jens is sitting in the RSNT Team bust today saying, “Shut Up Media…I won yesterday for the first time in ages.”

Categories: Riders / The Other Stuff

Frank Scherschel Photos Of The 1953 Tour 07/05/2012


© Frank Scherschel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

I just found this beautiful photo essay of the 1953 Tour, shot by Frank Scherschel for Life magazine. The images were mostly unpublished and have been released in time to coincide with this years Tour. The images over the top of the Tourmalet are amazing. If you have ever been up there you will know there really isn’t a lot of room to squeeze in a few thousand people. You can really feel the atmosphere in these shots. There was a great quote (below) written at the time that went with the images. Although I am not sure there was a lot of zooming going on over the top of the Tourmalet, especially on those bikes.

High atop the foggy Col du Tourmalet, one of the most difficult passes in the Pyrenees, thousands of Frenchmen gathered … to experience a single moment. It came when a group of cyclists zoomed into sight and zoomed right out again over the mountains.

See the full photo essay here: http://life.time.com/culture/tour-de-france-1953-rare-photos/#ixzz1znlNNBxt

Categories: Classic / Riders

Ode To A Sprinting Icon 05/21/2012


For 8 years I have had this copy of L’Equipe
I keep it in and around where my bike sits
For me it represents a “Golden Age” in sprinting
Zabel, Boonen, O’Grady, Hushovd, and McEwen
You were (are) all legends
But you were my favorite, still are
I loved how the French commentators shouted your name
McEwwwwwweeeeeeeeen
Seeing you burst out of a pack was a scary and amazing sight
You just never knew what to expect
It made us feel a little uneasy
You were unpredictable, all power and no fear
You were an entertainer
From pulling a “Wheelie” crossing the line at Alpe D’Huez
To “Head-Butting” Stuey at about 45mph – that was a first
Then there was the greatest sprint ever
Stage 1 in the 2007 Tour
Just how exactly did you do that?
You were on the ground with 20Km to go
And back on the back 5km out
Somehow you picked your way through
And showed up at the front with 100m to go
And still had time to salute
I have the frame in the picture above
I always introduce it as “the bike Robbie rode in 2004″
I am going to miss you in and around the pack
Although I have a feeling this won’t be the last we see of you

Chapeau Robbie – thanks for the memories,
And making the hairs on my neck stand up.

 

Categories: Riders